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PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF CROHN’S DISEASE. Astha Sidana, A.C. Rana, Nidhi Sharma, Ramica Sharma

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF CROHN’S DISEASE.

Astha Sidana, A.C. Rana, Nidhi Sharma, Ramica Sharma

International Journal of Natural Product Science 2012: Spl Issue 1:213.

Abstract(RBIP-213)

One of the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease is Crohn’s disease, other being ulcerative colitis, which causes inflammation of the full thickness of the bowel wall involving any part of the digestive tract from the mouth to the anus. Crohn's disease affects 2 - 7 out of 100,000 people and researchers believe that although children and older adults may also develop the condition. Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder that is neither medically nor surgically “curable” requiring therapeutic approaches to induce and maintain symptomatic control, improve quality of life, and minimize short- and long term toxicity and complications. Growing evidence suggests that genetic, psychological, inflammatory, intestinal epithelial permeability abnormality factors play significant role in the development of Crohn’s disease and the commensal bacterial flora which appears to be a critical element, particularly in regards to Crohn's disease. In recent years, it has become apparent that overproduction of the Th1 cytokines interleukin-12 and inferferon-γ in Crohn’s disease causes an imbalance between normally occurring positive (immunogenic or inflammatory) responses and negative (tolerogenic or anti-inflammatory) mucosal immune responses. Considerable data indicates that the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease can be explained by these factors, together with independent environmental triggers such as cigarette smoking. One of the next challenges in Crohn’s disease is to establish a better understanding of the complex interplay between signaling pathways induced simultaneously by distinct pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) which include Toll-like receptors (TLR) and intracellular proteins NOD1 and NOD2. Current investigations promise to yield fresh insights in the management of Crohn’s disease.
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